DNS Records Terms Explained

MX – An MX record is the record on your domain that routes email traffic to the proper servers currently hosting your email.

A – A record (Address Record) points a domain or subdomain to an IP address.

CNAME – A CNAME (Canonical Name) points one domain or subdomain to another domain name, allowing you to update one A Record each time you make a change, regardless of how many Host Records need to resolve to that IP address.

TXT – A TXT (Text) record was originally intended for human-readable text. These records are dynamic and can be used for several purposes (like verifying domain ownership when someone tells you to add a TXT record to prove so).

SRV – An SRV (Service) record points one domain to another domain name using a specific destination port.

AAAA – The AAAA record is similar to the A record, but it allows you to point the domain to an Ipv6 address.

‘@’ in Host Record – The @ symbol is used to indicate the root domain itself. In our example the Host Record ‘ftp’ would be for the subdomain ftp.google.com and ‘@’ would be google.com itself.

DNS Propagation – When DNS Records are added or updated, the change can take up to 48 hours to take effect due to caching. When your domain is opened in a web browser, the request is not going to the hosting server directly. It has to pass through several ISP (Internet Service Provider) nodes first, so your computer starts by checking local DNS cache. Afterwards, the request is sent to your Internet Service Provider, and from there, to the hosting server. Each node will check its cache first, and because ISP’s refresh their caching at different intervals, it can take some time for changes you’ve made to reflect globally.

Published by Mageek

Just another geek in the world

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